Social Constructs


Alright, I’m going to have to get used to the formatting on wordpress, as it’s clearly much more neat/organized than any given blog (I’m specifically referring to tumblr :)), in which the audience isn’t predominantly users between 12 and 16 years old.

Anyhow, I thoroughly enjoy delving into my thoughts, as though they were a world of their own. One thought currently on my mind is how an idea or a physical object can be perceived in such a twisted way, so as to be able to manipulate a target group. Commercialism is a classic example we see everywhere. While we walk the streets of downtown, permeated with ads of consumerism and overall garbage (as well as a surprising upsurge of hobos lately), we observe and shrug our shoulders out of a disregard of familiarity.

However, the constant barrage of visual displays have an extremely significant effect on how our minds are shaped, even though we may not directly see them. The perfect ad does not target its consumer in a matter of however many seconds it plays. Consider an infant’s growth. Anatomically speaking, its limbic system is still in development, all the meninges strengthening, neuronal connections growing. From an observable perspective, if you were to stare at the child for a day straight, you wouldn’t notice much, in prospects of growth. In psychology, they have a curve to explain this phenomenon. The Just Noticeable Difference (JND, the only thing I even remember from first-year psych lmfao) curve is used to graph those minute, imperceptible differences accounted for as a child’s mind grows into that of the adult.

One of the tools advertisements use to effectively attack the consumer is incision. By constantly repeating the same goddamn ad, over and over again, essentially reaffirms an artificially created truth to the claim, being whatever the ad is designed to lure you into. You gradually cease question the purpose or consequence of what you’re watching. Let’s take McDonald’s, for instance. There should be no argument whatsoever that the franchise is horribly unhealthy, yet I can’t help but consider driving down to the nearest McD’s everytime one of their commercials pop up on my TV, which is usually twice per 10 minutes :(. Why is that? Why aren’t I questioning the possible risks in cardiac, muscle, or organ health? There’s really only one simple answer to that. Cause I’m lovin’ it.

Now, not every social construct is built in maliciousness. Two of my friends began sowing the seed of desire into a third friend of mine this past summer. A few days ago, this seed bore bountiful fruit, as this third friend of mine bought a PS3. Let me just say that any typical guy who owns a ps3 would of course enjoy it to a degree. Had these two guys not planted that idea in his head that owning the console was like dying and going to heaven with 72 virgins, I’m almost certain that he wouldn’t be enjoying it as much as he is right now. Mind you, his school marks might go to shit, but that’s another post for another time lmfao.

But, of course, even in that example, you can still perceive it from a spiteful angle. The default logic to the malice in that situation would most likely be, “Fuck him, I hate him, I hope by hooking him onto something he otherwise wouldn’t have considered essential, it’ll haze his ability to properly see what is in fact important in his life, such as school, family, friends, etc.”

Ehhhh, I guess one of the few ways of avoiding a spiral into the mess that is mindless obedience to capitalistic culture (consumerism) would be to simply evaluate what it is you’re being presented, and what purpose, rather, what real benefit it has to your immediate lifestyle. But then again, when you want McDick’s, you want McDick’s…. LOL

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